Kinnitty High Cross, County Offaly

Kinnitty Hight Cross
Kinnitty Hight Cross

Kinnitty Hight Cross

Tt took two attempts to find this one … Kinnitty High Cross. Driving to Birr, I saw the signs for Kinnitty and made a note. On the way home, I found myself on a local road; winding towards the Slieve Bloom Mountains. Once in Kinnitty, I located the primary church.

After spending twenty minutes combing a cemetery (where most high crosses can be found), I was out of luck. I did find a descriptive panel describing the cross and I looked some more … but the cemetery wasn’t that big! It wasn’t there!

I saw signs for Kinnitty Castle and decided to check it out. After a couple of photos, I moved on … a bit disappointed.

Back at the B&B, I did some research. The cross had been moved. Guess where? A terrace at the castle! You have to be kidding. Now this became a challenge!

Later in the week, I swung back to Kinnitty. This time with a single purpose. When I arrived at the castle, the car park was full … a wedding! As I headed for the terrace, I realized I had a big problem.  The wedding party and guests were occupying the terrace for the reception.  I wasn’t quite dressed appropriately to blend in, but I wasn’t leaving without a photo. The problem?

So, I started to do some reconnaissance; trying to figure out how I could get in. Walking around the castle, I discovered that there are two terraces. The one in the front was people free! And off to the side, almost into the tree line was the cross! As I was taking photos, all I could think … You have to do a better job at seeking out all corners of a destination!

This is the Kinnitty High Cross! It’s craftsmanship is beautiful and was well worth the second trip!

High Crosses, Ahenny, County Tipperary

Ahenny’s high crosses are located on a monastic site called Kilclispeen. The two crosses, simply referred to as the North Cross and South Cross are beautiful. Both have ‘caps’ or ‘bishop mitres’, excellent Celtic knot work, and spiral patterns.

It is thought that high crosses were a place to meet for religious ceremonies; or it could be something a simple as a means to mark a land boundary.

Ahenny :: North Cross

Ahenny :: North Cross

Ahenny :: South Cross

Ahenny :: South Cross

Ahenny High Crosses :: Knots

Ahenny High Crosses :: Knots


Ahenny High Crosses :: Spirals

Ahenny High Crosses :: Spirals

Ahenny High Crosses :: Knotwork

Ahenny High Crosses :: Knotwork

Ahenny High Crosses :: Capstone

Ahenny High Crosses :: Capstone

Location via Google Maps:

High Crosses, Kilkieran, County Kilkenny

Information Sign

Information Sign

High crosses (sometimes referred to as standing crosses) are dated back to Irish and British origins. At Kilkieran, County Kilkenny, three of the earliest high crosses can be found. It is said that they date to the 9th century; two of them are ringed ‘Celtic crosses’ and have a capstone. The third is unique; it is very thin and is lacking a ‘ring.’ The crosses are located at Kilkieran Cemetery, north of Carrick-on-Suir.

Kilkieran :: West Cross

Kilkieran :: West Cross

Kilkieran :: West Cross Up Close

Kilkieran :: West Cross Up Close

Kilkieran :: West Cross Knotwork

Kilkieran :: West Cross Knotwork

Kilkieran :: Plain Cross

Kilkieran :: Plain Cross

Kilkieran :: North Cross

Kilkieran :: North Cross

Kilkieran :: North Cross

Kilkieran :: North Cross


Also onsite, was a holy well dedicated to St Kieran.

Kilkieran :: Holy Well

Kilkieran :: Holy Well

Kilkieran :: Holy Well Water

Kilkieran :: Holy Well Water

Kilkieran :: Holy Well Up Close

Kilkieran :: Holy Well Up Close


Location via Google Maps:

Rock of Cashel, Cashel, County Tipperary

Rock of Cashel :: The Rock

Rock of Cashel :: The Rock

What is the saying? Something about never going to the sights in one’s backyard…. Cashel became our ‘home’ away from home for two weeks. Everywhere we looked, there were signs or photos of the Rock of Cashel. We had driven by it a couple of times, but had both agreed that it wasn’t on our VIP list. There was always some other place that seemed a bigger priority as we determined our next stop.

Thanks to Kay, we made our way Thursday morning to the Rock of Cashel. What were we thinking? It was one of the best sights that we toured; clearly understanding why it makes the top ten list of places to visit in Ireland.

Rock of Cashel :: Choir

Rock of Cashel :: Choir

The Rock of Cashel has numerous legends, as well as historical events, that are linked to it. First, the ‘rock’ that the castle sits upon was originally 20 miles down the road.  However, when St. Patrick was completing some banishment … the rock was thrown and landed in Cashel.  It is also a place where St. Patrick supposedly converted the King of Munster.

What is known … it is huge!  Besides the castle ruins, there is also a chapel, a round tower, and a cathedral.  There are also high crosses on the grounds, as well as an active cemetery.  Most of the original buildings were built in the 12th-13th centuries.  It is truly a architectural wonder!

I would truly make sure that it is on your list to see!

Rock of Cashel :: Inner Courtyard

Rock of Cashel :: Inner Courtyard

Rock of Cashel :: South Transept

Rock of Cashel :: South Transept

Rock of Cashel :: Windows in North Transept

Rock of Cashel :: Windows in North Transept

Looking out over Cashel

Looking out over Cashel

Cormac's Chapel

Cormac’s Chapel

Cormac's Chapel

Cormac’s Chapel

Rock of Cashel :: Round Tower

Rock of Cashel :: Round Tower

Rock of Cashel :: Carvings

Rock of Cashel :: Carvings

Rock of Cashel :: Carvings

Rock of Cashel :: Carvings


Location via Google Maps:

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